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But since the book is fundamentally about the physics of extra dimensions I can understand the motivation to dive in from the start. Written in , this book presents an excellent overview of the previous couple of decades of work into Physics Beyond the Standard Model. What it really needs is a second edition, perhaps in a couple of years when we have results from the LHC at 13TeV.

In many places through the book she talks about the predictions being made and looks forward to the LHC results. Some variants, like Minimal Supersymmetry, are already dead in the water, with no evidence of the relatively light superpartners they predict. Most of the others are looking very troubled. Where do we go from here? It's not enough to carp from the sidelines, like Smolin, and complain that these theories are all bunk. We need answers and a way to plug up the yawning void sitting at the heart of the Standard Model. The road that science takes is littered with the husks of thousands of dead theories--once-promising ideas that had to be cast aside for better alternatives.

There's no doubt that many of the theories presented in Randall's book will join their number. But if ideas are a vector we need to know where it's starting from, and Prof. Randall presents an excellent overview of the state of play in PBSM in the early years of this century. Feb 11, Ollie rated it did not like it. Not because I enjoyed that book so much, but because it so thoroughly confused and frustrated me that I just assumed another book would do a better job of explaining the wonderful world of hidden dimensions.

Just like Hidden Reality, Warped Passages starts out well enough by explaining some basics about quantum physics but then very quickly snowballs into a mess of jargon and gobbledygook. And Randall tries, she really does, by making the subject a little bit more lighthearted, peppering her chapters with stories, examples, an idiotic non-fiction story involving Athena and Ike who cares? It just seems ridiculous to use the media of 2-D words on paper with the occasional drawing to explain something as complex.

Comics do a better job with much less effort. Warped Passages might be more easy to understand if someone were using this book as a way to study the subject and reading the chapters over and over again or if we could actually see the math instead of just asking us to imagine certain ideas or to trust Randall on a concept over and over and over again , but for the general audience, this is just a very frustrating book. I could not wait for it to end. Jun 10, B. Factor rated it did not like it. Chock full of misleading analogies, painful allegories, and irrelevant material cut-and-pasted from other failed writing projects.

I didn't find this book as irritating as some others around here seem to have found it. I can definitely, however, agree with the most common criticisms. The whole book suffers from a bloat borne of repetition and very odd, distracting analogies. Very, very often the same information is repeated several times, seemingly building to some greater point, only for the chapter to end with a bullet point summary of those same, repeated points.

And about those analogies, I cannot recall one of them tha I didn't find this book as irritating as some others around here seem to have found it. And about those analogies, I cannot recall one of them that actually added any clarity. There were several points during the book that I found myself wondering if I was reading an explanation, a joke, or a pop culture reference.

As has been pointed out by several other reviewers, the phrase, "Feel free to skip this part" should never appear so many times in any kind of book. In some ways the book is a victim of timing. As it was published some years before the opening of the Large Hadron Collider at CERN, there is a certain sense of wheel spinning as the theory waits for experimental verification. Perhaps if Warped Passages had been written ten or so years later there may have been more substance and less need for filler. There are some positives, though.

I definitely learned some things about theoretical physics. I found Randall's review of scientific progress and theory quite succinct and clear when free of those largely unnecessary analogies. I suppose Warped Passages could possibly make a reasonable jumping on point if you were inclined to really start reading about extra dimensions. I confess that I am not. Oct 10, Bree Chapa rated it liked it.

Sort of hard to follow, and confusing. However, I read it as a highschool AP chemistry student and it very well explained quantum mechanics and various other physics theories in a sort of simplistic way. Unsure if I'd recommend but I would definitely reread it to see if my understanding changes. Mar 14, David rated it really liked it.

Best description of alternate physics dimensions. Here you'll find an excellent discussion of some of the more radical new ideas from the model-building camp of theoretical physics. Taking ideas of higher dimensions and branes borrowed from string theory, Prof.

Randall and co-researchers have produced inter "Every now and then a man's mind is stretched by a new idea or sensation, and never shrinks back to its former dimensions. Randall and co-researchers have produced interesting models of physics in which the extra dimensions of string theory are shown to not all necessarily be miniscule curled-up planck-scale regions beyond experimental probing.

She demonstrates possibilities for larger additional dimensions the existence of which might be experimentally verified when the Large Hadron Collider swings into action, and alternative possibilities to supersymmetry for unification of the forces of nature. Don't be fooled by the journo's reassuring commentary on the cover. No journalist wants to admit that they can't make head nor tail of a 'pop' science book. Though Randall steers clear of mathematics there are many abstract concepts in this book that are not at all easy to grasp, especially the idea of non-spatial symmetries and symmetry breaking.

There's not very much cosmology in this book. It mainly concentrates on spatial geometry, particle physics, quantum field theory and the possible relationships between them. Of course the obligatory explanations of relativity, quantum mechanics and the standard model of fundamental particles and forces, all de rigueur for any pop science tract, comprise the first half of the book.

Randall has actually made a very brave move in publishing this work, because her conjectures might be disproved or at least thrown into doubt by the results of LHC experiments whereas string theory as a general concept will neither be proved nor disproved because the LHC doesn't probe anywhere near the energy scales needed to do so. More power to her elbow for doing so. Jun 17, Yevgeniy Brikman rated it really liked it. This book is an overview of modern particle physics as of and a surprisingly deep look at how the universe works at the sub-atomic level.

There are no equations or calculations, but you get far more technical detail here than a typical pop science book. While some parts are hard to follow, other parts are astonishingly well written, explaining incredibly complicated physical concepts through wonderful analogies. It's not easy reading, but it's worth the effort, as this book helps you real This book is an overview of modern particle physics as of and a surprisingly deep look at how the universe works at the sub-atomic level. We are still long way to clearly understand the concept of space and time, but the author's theory may be a step in the direction of advancement.

However, one of the major problems of this theory is that it is all talk theoretical but no substance no experimental evidence. We have to wait a little longer after the LHC data is completely analyzed and understood. The book is very well written and easy to understand; the author has explained the relevant physical concepts in a simple and lucid manner; highly recommended.

View all 5 comments. Dec 17, Jim Good rated it really liked it Shelves: Most of the book is a set up for the last couple chapters, by giving a history and accounting of the Standard Model of Quantum Mechanics and some baseline information on string theory. The last couple chapters deal with theories of extra dimensions and how they might be perceived and detected. Most extra dimensional theories have finite or small scaled that wrap back on themselves. She puts forth a theory of potentially infinite but warped extra dimensions and how those would manifest. Also much Most of the book is a set up for the last couple chapters, by giving a history and accounting of the Standard Model of Quantum Mechanics and some baseline information on string theory.

Also much discussion of branes which can trap particles to make them appear as less dimensions than there really are. Randall's writing style drove me nearly crazy, but as I continued to read, either she started to get her bearings or else I got more used to it. In any event, I found this a fascinating book. Technically it is very challenging -- I am not going to pretend that I truly grasped most of what she was writing about; however, I was able, at least at some level, to follow the story she was telling, and that was a welcome sort of challenge. I enjoyed this book en Through the early pages of the book, Dr.

I enjoyed this book enough to have recently ordered "Knocking on Heaven's Door," her newest tome. Jun 06, Cyndie rated it liked it Recommended to Cyndie by: I won't begin to pretend that I completely wrapped my mind around everything in this book.

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It definitely peaked by curiosity and I am intrigued to learn more, but this is no "particle physics for dummies". Some fascinating concepts contained within. Definitely helped open my eyes to some of the crazier aspects of our world. Mar 12, Hadrian rated it liked it Shelves: Good overview of some recent developments in string theory, but some muddled explanations made this a slog.

I skipped to the end of the chapters and read the bullet points too often. May 06, Charles rated it really liked it. The Standard Model of particle physics is the most successful scientific theory ever produced. It's capable of making predictions that turn out to be incredibly accurate, down to many decimal places. It's produced surprising predictions that turn out to be true. The discovery of the Higgs boson a few years ago cemented in the capstone of its success. But it also has a massive, gaping hole in the middle of it, a flaw that has consumed the efforts of several generations of physicists and continues The Standard Model of particle physics is the most successful scientific theory ever produced.

But it also has a massive, gaping hole in the middle of it, a flaw that has consumed the efforts of several generations of physicists and continues to represent an impenetrable mystery. This book is ten years old now, but still presents an absorbing account of the efforts being made to unravel this mystery in a readable and approachable manner and is an excellent starting point for anyone looking to find out about string theory, supersymmetry and extra dimensions. This is a cluster of theories that can interact in surprising ways, but Randall manages to plot a course through the thicket that makes a degree of sense.

As with all popular science books it's hobbled by the requirement to translate purely mathematical concepts into semi-intuitive ideas. This will always present problems, as an intuitive understanding is inherently flawed--if you really want to grasp the nature of these theories you need to do the maths I'd recommend Leonard Susskind 's The Theoretical Minimum: There are a few problems with the book that might have been improved.

As others have noted, she opens with several chapters concerning higher dimensions and how they could fit into what appears to be a strictly three dimensional world, but then veers off into presenting relativity, uncertainty and the Standard Model, only returning to the subject of dimensionality 10 chapters later.

Unfortunately there's no way of discussing these subjects properly without shoehorning in all the undergraduate spadework that needs to be covered for anything else to make sense. The book would probably have flowed a bit more elegantly if the introduction to dimensionality were moved later in the work. But since the book is fundamentally about the physics of extra dimensions I can understand the motivation to dive in from the start.

Written in , this book presents an excellent overview of the previous couple of decades of work into Physics Beyond the Standard Model. What it really needs is a second edition, perhaps in a couple of years when we have results from the LHC at 13TeV. In many places through the book she talks about the predictions being made and looks forward to the LHC results.

It's no secret that many of these predictions have fallen flat. Some variants, like Minimal Supersymmetry, are already dead in the water, with no evidence of the relatively light superpartners they predict. Most of the others are looking very troubled.

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Where do we go from here? It's not enough to carp from the sidelines, like Smolin, and complain that these theories are all bunk. We need answers and a way to plug up the yawning void sitting at the heart of the Standard Model. The road that science takes is littered with the husks of thousands of dead theories--once-promising ideas that had to be cast aside for better alternatives. There's no doubt that many of the theories presented in Randall's book will join their number. But if ideas are a vector we need to know where it's starting from, and Prof.

Randall presents an excellent overview of the state of play in PBSM in the early years of this century. Feb 11, Ollie rated it did not like it. Not because I enjoyed that book so much, but because it so thoroughly confused and frustrated me that I just assumed another book would do a better job of explaining the wonderful world of hidden dimensions.

Just like Hidden Reality, Warped Passages starts out well enough by explaining some basics about quantum physics but then very quickly snowballs into a mess of jargon and gobbledygook. And Randall tries, she really does, by making the subject a little bit more lighthearted, peppering her chapters with stories, examples, an idiotic non-fiction story involving Athena and Ike who cares? It just seems ridiculous to use the media of 2-D words on paper with the occasional drawing to explain something as complex. Comics do a better job with much less effort.

Warped Passages might be more easy to understand if someone were using this book as a way to study the subject and reading the chapters over and over again or if we could actually see the math instead of just asking us to imagine certain ideas or to trust Randall on a concept over and over and over again , but for the general audience, this is just a very frustrating book.

I could not wait for it to end. Jun 10, B. Factor rated it did not like it. Chock full of misleading analogies, painful allegories, and irrelevant material cut-and-pasted from other failed writing projects. I didn't find this book as irritating as some others around here seem to have found it. I can definitely, however, agree with the most common criticisms. The whole book suffers from a bloat borne of repetition and very odd, distracting analogies.

Very, very often the same information is repeated several times, seemingly building to some greater point, only for the chapter to end with a bullet point summary of those same, repeated points. And about those analogies, I cannot recall one of them tha I didn't find this book as irritating as some others around here seem to have found it.

And about those analogies, I cannot recall one of them that actually added any clarity. There were several points during the book that I found myself wondering if I was reading an explanation, a joke, or a pop culture reference. As has been pointed out by several other reviewers, the phrase, "Feel free to skip this part" should never appear so many times in any kind of book. In some ways the book is a victim of timing.

As it was published some years before the opening of the Large Hadron Collider at CERN, there is a certain sense of wheel spinning as the theory waits for experimental verification. Perhaps if Warped Passages had been written ten or so years later there may have been more substance and less need for filler.

There are some positives, though. My search led me deep into Jewish history to understand how the color came to be associated with Jews in daily life, trade, and business by compiling examples of Jews dressed in yellow that evolved and adapted to local situations over time. Gold, the color of divine love and truth, is certainly a more conventional and expected choice for a garment worn by a saint than is yellow.

The depth of meaning, history, and narrative provided in the use of a saffron hued yellow, would have appealed to his archeologist and humanist spirit much more than the expected blue or gold. It is no accident that the two women most closely linked to the narrative recognition of Jesus as the Messiah, Mary and St. Elizabeth, are the female figures Mantegna chooses to depict in yellow turbans. Their Jewish origins are essential to the Christian rationalization of the unbroken line from God and the laws given to Moses through the Old Testament to Jesus and the Catholic Church. So that even the most virulent of Christian anti- Semites could not deny that she, the most blessed among women, was a Jew.

From his knowledge of the classics, he takes an archeological approach in his work and illustrates the link between the Old and New Testaments in every object as a kind of chronicle of events. He visually translates the writing of St. Tempera on canvas. Paris, France. Louvre Museum. Instead, the unique head wrap was, I suggest, first depicted on St.

Elisabeth in his Madonna della Vittoria altarpiece plate 3 completed in Unlike his Adoration of the Magi, the date, and the many events and details surrounding its commission and completion are well documented and the subject of much research. This work was created around events involving a Jewish Mantuan family who were, as will be related, forced to commission the painting. Though art historians have said that their lack of representation in the painting is emblematic of the anti-Semitism of the time, I will argue that the yellow-turbaned Saint Elizabeth was intended to represent the Jewish family— though not to honor them as one might expect of a patron.

Her placement was intended as a message of judgment on the Jewish family who, in contrast, had removed the image of the Madonna from their home. It is this work where I believe Mantegna cleverly first develops this lustrous accessory and captures the popular imagination of viewers and then applies it to the Madonna in later works. However, in , Daniele Norsa, a Jewish banker from a well- established and respected family in the region, bought a house in the center of Mantua. Perceived negatively by many Christian inhabitants of the city, various disruptions occurred as a result.

Storti, , p. Afosti e D. The finished altarpiece was carried through streets accompanied by youths dressed as angels and apostles singing lauds while the streets were packed with people from the entire region who came to watch in solemnity until it was finally placed in the location from which Norsa had removed the original image of the Madonna.

KATZ, op. Sixty-Second Edition. On the other side of the Madonna is Saint Elizabeth, also on her knees, a step below Gonzaga, on the bare ground and wearing a yellow turban — the brightest point on the entire canvas. Elizabeth was not made inadvertently to an audience that was likely to know her importance in relationship to the Virgin.

Like the Norsa family members, St. Elizabeth was born Jewish. But, unlike the Norsa, St. Elizabeth is known for being the first to perceive that Mary and the child she carried were sacred. With the yellow headdress as a visual communication tool in the development of his characters, the painting was not likely intended as a message of conversion, which 21 Ivi, p. Icon Editions, , p. Elizabeth; P. She is too old to represent the twenty-one year-old Isabella. The halo would also suggest that she is not the famous nun.

The figure of St. The yellow turban on St. Elizabeth was not an arbitrary decision. The Mantuan public was well aware of the significance of the yellow hat provided by Domenico da Ponzone, and they were, likewise, well aware of the punishment inflicted on the Norsa family over the course of several years that included demonstrations and the razing of their home.

June By placing a Jewess humbly on the ground, reverently looking up at the woman she recognized as the mother of the Messiah, the comparison and the judgment on the Norsa is clear. In Rome, for a period of time Jewish men were ordered to wear red tabards and Jewish women red overskirts. In some parts of France the signifier was a circular patch, half red and half black, and in England it was a strip of cloth around the arm in contrasting color to the garment.

In Germany, Poland and later in Northern Italy, the pointed, yellow Judenhut, or the variations like the bretta zalda were most common.


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Canon In Padua, where Mantegna was born and spent his youth, the use of the yellow badge was instituted as early as , and the laws were repeated in and The familiarity with these dress codes supports the argument that Mantegna understood a greater social significance when choosing to them to adorn his subjects. Perhaps they were not always negative. Sometimes the ruota was prescribed with different placement depending on male or female dress. In addition, various headpieces evolved for women, in addition to yellow veils, there were also pointed hats and blue striped veils.

It had to be worn winter or summer or risk a month in prison. For women, a yellow scarf was obligatory over her head or in view on another part of her body.

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The lack of specifications for women in these edicts might suggest there was less concern for Jewish women than for Jewish men. Yet imagery of women with head coverings corresponding to the few statute descriptions appear in both Christian and Jewish artwork throughout Europe with a similar purpose of recognizing the wearer as Jewish. Is it also possible that the artwork reflected a social norm that Jewish women were wearing the headdresses even if not dictated? Perhaps they were, as I suggest, a commonly used accessory, worn by choice for centuries to self-identify.

This would have eliminated the need of an imposed marker and explain their comprehensive religion-specific representation. Plate 5: Gentile da Fabriano, Quaratesi Polyptych; Saint Nicholas gives three gold balls to three poor young women detail tempera on board.

Vatican City, Pinacoteca Vaticana. The first recorded dress codes for Jews date back to eighth-century Egypt and the first instance of a color specification in such laws was in the ninth-century under the Caliphate al-Mutawakkil, when Jews were required to wear either a yellow Persian mantle along with the traditional pre-Islamic Persian hat or a yellow turban.

While Jews held a more privileged status than Christians in fourteenth-century Egypt, there are, for example, accounts of Christians donning yellow turbans to disguise themselves as Jews in the hopes of receiving less severe treatment. Under the Caliph al-Mutawakkil, Dhimmis were required to wear a yellow mantle and a cord belt, the zunndr, a word that has come to signify the Jewish side locks peoth in modern Egyptian. This was the first use of a distinguishing color. The Persian, or Phrygian hat, became the Jewish hat once Muslims began to wear the turban, but it is not clear if it had to be yellow, only that it had to be of specific color choices.

After the Christian reconquest, men begin to wear the yellow cap instead of a yellow turban. The article, though written by a professor of Jewish History at the University of Wisconsin, Madison, is not cited. However, given the historic use of these turbans to classify Jews in the Islamic world, it is possible that it was already familiar to Venetians or some time given their long history of contact with the east.

In his time in Venice, or through his brother-in- law, Giovanni Bellini, Mantegna may have had knowledge of the garment. Paul Getty Museum, Los Angeles , p. Mantua was also known for its liberal policies towards their Jewish population and general fascination with Judaism. Gonzaga forbid physical harm of anyone, including Jews with penalties for such acts. There is some disagreement as to which version was commissioned by Ludovico III.

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Elizabeth reflects these exotic interests by using an accessory clearly reminiscent of the Orient, and therefore, the past. Elizabeth, and later the Madonna, in yellow was an anomaly. Yet there were precedents for using the accessory to identify other figures populating scenes in antiquity. Mantegna himself first employed a yellow veil as an identifying device on a female figure standing behind Mary in an austere version of Presentation at the Temple painted nearly forty years 58 S.

My research suggests the yellow veil was an established artistic convention used to identify Jewish women long before Mantegna painted his yellow turbaned Madonnas. By the early Renaissance, the yellow veil was one component in the commonly used visual language of Christian iconography used to illustrate scenes understood to take place in a Jewish setting. Often found in scenes like the Birth of Mary and the Presentation at the Temple, the yellow veil was an important and established artistic device. Tempera on wood. In one example from the trecento, Pietro Lorenzetti depicted St.

Anne in a yellow veil in the Birth of the Virgin in plate 7. Anne wears a long yellow veil and another woman, perhaps an attendant wears another bi-corned yellow headdress that likely reflects the yellow strip of cloth wound around the head required of women living in Recanati plate 8. Plate 9: Vittore Carpaccio, Birth of the Virgin