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e-book Gardens for the Senses, Gardening as Therapy Revised and Expanded Editon

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In short, being around plants can help to improve relationships between people and increase their concern and empathy toward others. Spending time in natural environments makes people better at doing their jobs. It also increases energy levels and feelings of vitality. Spending time in nature gives people an increased feeling of vitality, increasing their energy levels and making them feel more animated. Their performance levels are, in turn, increased by this improved state of mind. Natural environments induce a positive outlook on life, making people feel more alive and active.

When people experience increased vigor, they put more of themselves and their energy into their work. Plants can help people to improve their performance at work and at home by increasing their perceived vitality and giving them more feelings of added energy. Research shows that children who spend time around plants learn better.

In addition, being around natural environments improves the ability of children with Attention Deficit Disorder to focus, concentrate, and engage more with their surrounding environment. This improves their ability to learn new things and makes it easier for them to absorb and retain information. Specifically for children with problems paying attention, adding plants to the classroom can have a dramatic positive effect on the way they learn.

For example, children with Attention Deficit Disorder, learning in a natural environment can help them to engage more in the classroom, improving their focus and concentration on the task at hand. The soothing effects of natural aesthetic beauty help to minimize the distractions that would otherwise occupy their minds. By altering the environment in which children learn, plants can help them to learn better. Medicinal Properties. Cultivating plants is beneficial to humankind because of the many medicinal properties of trees and foliage plants.

One of the more obvious benefits of plants and trees is that many of them have valuable medicinal properties. Cultivating plants helps humanity because it provides opportunities for additional scientific studies of the possible positive medicinal values of plants. Natural herbal remedies are simple and holistic methods for treating common illnesses and maladies. Some can be made in the home and are a natural way to treat minor complaints. By cultivating plants we can continue to cultivate our knowledge of the natural world and arm ourselves with more defenses against disease and infection.

Brethour Mental Health. Studies have proven that people who spend more time outside in nature have better mental health and a more positive outlook on life. People who spend more time outside in nature have a significantly more positive outlook on life than people who spend a great deal of time indoors.

People who spend time outside every day are less likely to be depressed or stressed, and thus have fewer burdens on their mental health. Perceived Quality of Life. People associate beautifully landscaped areas with a higher quality of life. This is important in attracting businesses and sustaining growth in the community. People associate living in areas with a great deal of natural beauty with a higher quality of life.

A high quality of life, in turn, benefits the entire community, because residents spend more money and positively affect the economy and social pulse of the town and can also attract new businesses.

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Thriving communities are ones in which natural beauty is appreciated as a part of an overall high quality of life, which is why installing landscaping is crucial to both the success and happiness of the individual and the public. Neighborhoods with beautiful parks tend to have less crime. This is due in part to the effect that parks have on a community; parks give people a reason to come together and become a tight-knit community.

People who care about their neighborhood parks are much more likely to get politically involved when businesses threaten to downsize them. Increasing political activism in the community is another positive outcome of cultivating a love for neighborhood parks. Neighborhoods with beautiful parks and landscaping have reduced crime rates.

This is due to the increase in community cohesion that occurs as a neighborhood rallies around a beautiful local landmark. When residents feel greater pride in the beauty of where they live, they are much less likely to detract from it either by graffiti or endangering people within it. The authors declare that there is no conflict of interests regarding the publication of this paper. National Center for Biotechnology Information , U. Journal List J Aging Res v. J Aging Res. Published online Mar 6. Scott D.

Author information Article notes Copyright and License information Disclaimer. Wright: ude. Wright and A. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. This article has been cited by other articles in PMC.

Process and Procedure for the Selected Literature Review The literature was systematically reviewed for relevant and peer-reviewed journals, books, and book chapters as well as contemporary annotated releases of classic and modern literature such as Thoreau's Walden and Virgil's Georgics. How Does Your Garden Grow? Synopsis and Conclusions to the Review Paper The purpose of this paper was to review several multidisciplinary nodes of gardening and the aging experience and to examine two specific issues: a gardening as a significant activity to engage the cultivation of caring across the life course, and b as a way to enhance the notion of stewardship in supporting environmental health in the context of home and community based settings.

But listen to how Harrison [ 75 ] has interpreted notre jardin from Voltaire's story, Notre jardin is never a garden of merely private concerns into which one escapes from the real; it is that plot of soil on the earth, within the self, or amid the social collective, where the cultural, ethical, and civic virtues that save reality from its own worst impulses are cultivated. In the book, The Wild Braid [ 76 ], the nexus of cultivation, caring, and the life course are poignantly discovered, I think of gardening as an extension of one's own being, something as deeply personal and intimate as writing a poem.

Conflict of Interests The authors declare that there is no conflict of interests regarding the publication of this paper. References 1. Wright SD, Lund D.

Healing Garden Design

Gray and green? Journal of Aging Studies. The Gerontological Society of America. Environmental sustainability in an aging society: a research agenda. Journal of Aging and Health. Sykes K, Pillemer K. The intersection of aging and the environment: introduction. Universal design: a step toward successful aging.

Journal of Aging Research. Janick J. Horticulture and human culture. In: Relf D, editor. Relf D. Human Issues in Horticulture. Browne CA. The role of nature for the promotion of well-being in the elderly. Older adults, chronic disease and leisure-time physical activity. Ashton-Shaeffer C, Constant A. Why do older adults garden?

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Activities, Adaptation and Aging. Bhatti M. Sociological Review. Carman J. Educational Gerontology. Physical and psychological health conditions of older adults classified as gardeners or nongardeners. Shoemaker CA, Lin M. A model for healthy aging with horticulture. Wang D, MacMillan T. The benefits of gardening for older adults: a systematic review of the literature. Francese P. Horticulture is hot. American Demographics. Gross H, Lane N. Landscapes of the lifespan: exploring accounts of own gardens and gardening.

10 ways horticulture helps us heal, overcome anxiety and lift low mood

Journal of Environmental Psychology. The new gentleman farmer. Wall Street Journal Money. Eddison S. Cassidy P. London, UK: Arness; Oxford English Dictionary. Van Sweden J. Harte S. Zen Gardening. Pigeat JP. Paris, France: Flammarion; Schinz M. Visions of Gardens: Themes and Variations on the Garden. Jamison M. The joy of gardening: collectivist and bureaucratic cultures in conflict. The Sociological Quarterly.

Reynolds R. On Guerrilla Gardening. London, UK: Bloomsbury; Ross S. Journal of Aesthetic Education. What Gardens Mean. Pizzoni F. Adams WH. Nature Perfected: Gardens Through History. Comito T. The Idea of the Garden in the Renaissance. Conan M, Whangheng C, editors. Gardens, City Life and Culture. Constantine S. Amateur gardening and popular recreation in the 19th and 20th centuries.

Journal of Social History. Grampp C. Pollan M. In: Punch W, editor. Punch W. Taylor P, editor. The Oxford Companion to the Garden. Turner T. Belting H. Hieronymus Bosch: Garden of Earthly Delights. Cohen G. Kauppinen H, McKee P. Old age, painting, and gerontology. Lindauer M. Ravin G, Kenyon C. Artistic vision in old age: claude Monet and Edgar Degas. In: Adams-Price CE, editor. Rosand D. Style and the aging artist. Art Journal. Denvir B. Impressionism: The Painters and the Paintings.

London, UK: Studio Editions; Southgate MT. Water lilies. Journal of American Medical Association. Holmes C. Monet at Giverny. Marmor MF. Archives of Ophthalmology. Bakalar NN. Dotinga RR. Photoshop re-creates aging impressionists' eye on the world, Wired Magazine. Ravin JG. Geriatrics and painting. Werner J. Aging through the eyes of Monet; pp. Berger S, Porell F. The association between low vision and function. The greatest generation meets its greatest challenge: vision loss and depression in older adults.

Journal of Visual Impairment and Blindness. Simonds M, editor. Gardens: A Literary Companion. Vancouver, Canada: Greystone Books; Marranca B, editor.


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Garmey J, editor. The Writer in the Garden. Hellyer A. Your Garden Week by Week. London, UK: Collingridge; Kincaid J. My Garden. Ackerman D. New Shoots, Old Tips. London, UK: Frances Lincoln; Kingsolver B. Fenton J. Gardening with attitude. New York Review of Books. Thoreau HD, Harding W, editors. Walden: An Annotated Edition. Thoreau HD. Betts EW. Burnett FH.

The Secret Garden. Lippincott Company; Baudelaire C, Howard R. Les Fleurs Du Mal. Godine; Eliot TS. Collected Poems: — Wagner R.

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Sabini M, editor. Albers L. The perception of gardening as art.


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Garden History. Harrison RP. Gardens: An Essay and the Human Condition. Kunitz S, Lentine G. Bergman I. As a result, residents of neighborhoods with beautiful parks are much healthier; their increase in exercise makes them less susceptible to physical ailments and more resilient against minor illnesses. As a result, these residents do not spend as much each year on health care and medical treatment, because they require fewer of these services Healthy people are happier people; residents who exercise often have excellent overall health and therefore have a more positive mental outlook.

The presence of parks in neighborhoods encourages residents to exercise, thus improving their physical state and enabling them to more fully enjoy their lives. Accelerates Healing Process. Shrubs, trees, and flowers have a practical application in hospitals: the presence of plants in patient recovery rooms greatly reduces the time necessary to heal. The soothing effects of ornamental flowers and plants are so great that simply having daily views of flowers and other ornamental plants in landscaped areas outside patient recovery room significantly speed up recovery time.

Another technique to decrease recovery time is horticulture therapy, where patients care for and nurture plants themselves.

Health and well-being benefits of plants

Patients who physically interact with plants experience a significantly reduced recovery time after medical procedures. Research shows that people who spend extended lengths of time around plants tend to have better relationships with others. This is due to measurable increases in feelings of compassion; another effect of exposure to ornamental plants. Ornamental plants affect the levels of compassion that people feel for others.

Studies have shown that people who spend more time around plants are much more likely to try and help others, and often have more advanced social relationships. People who care for nature are more likely to care for others, reaching out to their peers and forming shared bonds resulting from their common interests. In short, being around plants can help to improve relationships between people and increase their concern and empathy toward others. Spending time in natural environments makes people better at doing their jobs.

It also increases energy levels and feelings of vitality. Spending time in nature gives people an increased feeling of vitality, increasing their energy levels and making them feel more animated. Their performance levels are, in turn, increased by this improved state of mind. Natural environments induce a positive outlook on life, making people feel more alive and active. When people experience increased vigor, they put more of themselves and their energy into their work.

Plants can help people to improve their performance at work and at home by increasing their perceived vitality and giving them more feelings of added energy. Research shows that children who spend time around plants learn better. In addition, being around natural environments improves the ability of children with Attention Deficit Disorder to focus, concentrate, and engage more with their surrounding environment. This improves their ability to learn new things and makes it easier for them to absorb and retain information.

Specifically for children with problems paying attention, adding plants to the classroom can have a dramatic positive effect on the way they learn. For example, children with Attention Deficit Disorder, learning in a natural environment can help them to engage more in the classroom, improving their focus and concentration on the task at hand. The soothing effects of natural aesthetic beauty help to minimize the distractions that would otherwise occupy their minds.

By altering the environment in which children learn, plants can help them to learn better. Medicinal Properties. Cultivating plants is beneficial to humankind because of the many medicinal properties of trees and foliage plants. One of the more obvious benefits of plants and trees is that many of them have valuable medicinal properties.

Cultivating plants helps humanity because it provides opportunities for additional scientific studies of the possible positive medicinal values of plants. Natural herbal remedies are simple and holistic methods for treating common illnesses and maladies. Some can be made in the home and are a natural way to treat minor complaints. By cultivating plants we can continue to cultivate our knowledge of the natural world and arm ourselves with more defenses against disease and infection.

Brethour Mental Health. Studies have proven that people who spend more time outside in nature have better mental health and a more positive outlook on life. People who spend more time outside in nature have a significantly more positive outlook on life than people who spend a great deal of time indoors. People who spend time outside every day are less likely to be depressed or stressed, and thus have fewer burdens on their mental health.